The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 3D


The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 3D. 2013.

A young woman travels to Texas to collect an inheritance; little does she know that an encounter with a chainsaw-wielding killer is part of the reward.  (IMDb)

The long awaited sequel to the 74 classic Tobe Hooper bloodbath has opened this weekend.  I was unfortunate enough to miss the opening night due to some unforseen circumstances but will be catching the next showing  tonight.  I will be honest I have been itching badly for a good TCM flick since 2006’s Texas Chainsaw the beginning.  God I love a villain who chops up victims terribly and uses their skin for masks, don’t you.  We have had scary leatherface’s, fat leatherfaces (TCMNG), and an awkwardly horny leatherface (TCM3);  I loved em all, so I’m hoping relatively skinny leatherface in TCM3D will be just as loveable and horrendously vicious. In the meantime here a few early reviews and thoughts on the film and some TCM nostalgia to keep you (actually me) occupied until later today.


The Texas Chainsaw Massacre

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre.

Leatherface 1974.  Late for a business meeting.

Leatherface 1974. Late for a business meeting.

The Texas Chain Saw Massacre is a 1974 American slasher film, directed and produced by Tobe Hooper, who cowrote it with Kim Henkel. It stars Marilyn Burns, Paul A. Partain, Edwin Neal, Jim Siedow and Gunnar Hansen, who respectively portray Sally Hardesty, Franklin Hardesty, the hitchhiker, the proprietor and Leatherface, the main antagonist. The film follows a group of friends who fall victim to a family of cannibals while on their way to visit an old homestead. Although it was marketed as a true story to attract a wider audience and as a subtle commentary on the era’s political climate, its plot is entirely fictional; however the character of Leatherface and minor plot details were inspired by the crimes of real-life murderer Ed Gein.

Hooper produced the film for less than $300,000 and used a cast of relatively unknown actors drawn mainly from central Texas, where the film was shot. The limited budget forced Hooper to film for long hours seven days a week, so that he could finish as quickly as possible and reduce equipment rental costs. Due to the film’s violent content, Hooper struggled to find a distributor. Louis Perano of Bryanston Pictures eventually purchased the distribution rights. Hooper limited the quantity of onscreen gore in hopes of securing a ‘PG’ rating, but the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) rated it ‘R’. The film faced similar difficulties internationally.  (Wikipedia)


The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2. 1986.

Leatherface.  Some skin toner is needed.

Leatherface. Some skin toner is needed.

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2 (also known as The Texas Chainsaw Massacre Part 2) is a 1986 American horror dark comedy slasher film, directed by Tobe Hooper. It is a sequel to the 1974 horror classic The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, also directed and co-written by Hooper. It was written by L. M. Kit Carson and produced by Carson, Yoram Globus, Menahem Golan and Hooper. The film stars Dennis Hopper as “Lefty”, Caroline Williams as “Stretch”, Bill Johnson as “Leatherface”, Bill Moseley as “Chop Top” and Jim Siedow, who reprises the role of “The Cook”. The sequel was highly criticized by some for its stylistic departure from the first film, including its bigger budget and emphasis on gore and wacky black comedy, as opposed to the original which utilized minimal gore, a low-budget vérité style and atmosphere to build tension and fear. The emphasis was on black comedy, which director Tobe Hooper believed was present in the first film, but unacknowledged by viewers because of its realistic and shocking content. Despite being successful in its initial 1986 theatrical run, the film failed to make a substantial profit for the studio; however, it eventually garnered a cult following and became popular on home video, which led to a special edition release of the film on DVD in 2006. (Wikipedia)


Leatherface: Texas Chainsaw Massacre 3

Leatherface: Texas Chainsaw Massacre 3. 1990

Open wide.

Open wide.

Leatherface: The Texas Chainsaw Massacre III is the second sequel to the 1974 film The Texas Chain Saw Massacre and was directed by Jeff Burr. It was released by New Line Cinema on January 12, 1990. The film is both a sequel and a reboot to the previous movies, as the original Sawyer family and apparently the Leatherface character died in the previous film. The film stars Kate Hodge, Ken Foree, William Butler, and a then-unknown Viggo Mortensen. At first, New Line Cinema intended to produce the film as the first of several sequels in the series. However, the film did not prove a financial success, although Jeff Burr did receive a nomination for the International Fantasy Film Award at the Fantasporto film festival in 1990. Leatherface gained a certain amount of notoriety prior to release due to a battle between New Line Cinema and the MPAA, which initially rated the film an X because of its graphic violence. It was the final film to receive this classification before the MPAA replaced X with NC-17. The studio eventually relented, and trimmed the more graphic elements, however, in 2003 it released the uncut version in VHS and DVD formats. (Wikipedia)


TCMTNG

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Next Generation. 1994.

Ohhh my hair.

Ohhh my hair. A sexually confused leatherface in TCM The Next Generation.

Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Next Generation (originally known as The Return of the Texas Chainsaw Massacre) is a 1994 independent American slasher film written and directed by Kim Henkel, and starring Renée Zellweger and Matthew McConaughey, both before they became mainstream stars. The film is a loose remake of and quasi-sequel to the original The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974), which Henkel had co-written with Tobe Hooper. It only has loose connections to the previous two sequel films, which are mentioned in the film’s opening prologue as “two minor, yet apparently related incidents” which happened after the events of the original film. The plot centers on a group of teenagers who find themselves in a secluded area of forest on their prom night, only to cross paths with a family of murderers, among them the chainsaw-wielding Leatherface. The movie was filmed in Pflugerville, Texas in 1994 on a budget of $600,000, and was released at several film festivals under the title, The Return of the Texas Chainsaw Massacre. It was then shelved for three years, and was re-cut and released under the title, Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Next Generation in late summer 1997, after its two lead actors had both become major Hollywood stars. (Wikipedia)


The Texas Chainsaw Massacre

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre. 2003.

Smile.

Smile.

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre is a 2003 American slasher film, and a remake of the 1974 horror film of the same name. The 2003 film was directed by Marcus Nispel and produced by Michael Bay. It was also co-produced by Kim Henkel and Tobe Hooper, co-creators of the original 1974 film. This film is the first of many horror remakes to come from Michael Bay’s Platinum Dunes production company which also remade The Amityville Horror, The Hitcher, Friday the 13th, and A Nightmare on Elm Street. Though met with negative reception from critics, the film was well received by fans, and grossed $107 million worldwide above its $9.5 million budget, making it a strong financial success. A sequel was planned, but was later made into a prequel, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning, was released in 2006 to negative reviews from critics. (Wikipedia)


The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning. 2006.

Absolutely badass!

Absolutely badass!

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning is a 2006 American slasher film that functions as a prequel to the 2003 remake, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre. Directed by Jonathan Liebesman and co-produced by Kim Henkel and Tobe Hooper (co-creators of the original 1974 film), the film went into release in North America on October 6, 2006. The film’s story takes place four years before the timeline of the 2003 remake. It stars Jordana Brewster, Diora Baird, Taylor Handley, Matt Bomer, and R. Lee Ermey. Originally, the film had the subtitle The Origin. New Line Cinema had to pay $3.1 million more than expected in order to keep the rights to the franchise after Dimension Films made a large offer to buy it from the original rightholders. The film grossed less than half of what the original film had grossed. (Wikipedia)

Long Live the Saw

Be Sociable, Share!
Comments
  1. The film with Renée Zellweger and Matthew McConaughey is kind of like shoving something up your urethra: uncomfortable and unnecessary.